Vangelis

The great greek musician. Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (born 1943; is a Greek composer of electronic, progressive, ambient and orchestral music, under the artist name Vangelis . He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots of Fire, and scores for the films Blade Runner and 1492: Conquest of Paradise. Vangelis began his professional musical career working with several popular bands of the 1960s such as The Formynx and Aphrodite's Child. In the 1970s, Vangelis formed a musical partnership with Jon Anderson, the lead singer of progressive rock band Yes, and the duo went on to release several albums together under the alias Jon & Vangelis. Towards the end of the 1970s, Vangelis composed music scores for several animal documentaries, including Opéra sauvage, the success of these scores moved Vangelis into the eyes of well known filmmakers. In 1981, he composed the score for the Oscar-winning film Chariots of Fire.
Vangelis
Vangelis - Antarctica (Blu-Ray)

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1983 / 2015
The music is the famous soundtrack which Vangelis composed for this movie. One of his best music and now you can see what he made it for. This movie was never released in Europe.

Plot: The story of Japan's first scientific expedition to the Antarctic in 1958, where Ushioda and Ochi were confronted by a severe winter with their 15 sled dogs. Forced to abandon their dogs in order to survive, they return a year later to search for them...
Cast: Ken Takakura / Tsunehiko Watase / Eiji Okada / Natsume Masako / Keiko Oginome
Overview: It's a story about Japan's first scientific expedition to the Antarctic in 1958, where Ushioda and Ochi were confronted by a severe winter with their 15 sled dogs. Later they were forced to abandon all of their sled dogs in an attempt to get back home safely. They apologized for not taking the dogs with them, but people were angry and upset that they left all those beloved dogs behind. A year later, when they returned to the Antarctic to search for the dogs, they found something incredible: two of the sled dogs were still alive, against the odds of extreme weather conditions.

 

28,50 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Anthem

Artist: Vangelis
P: 2002
This is the musicpiece, Vangelis composed for the football championship 2002 in Korea / Japan.

Here the last copy.

17,85 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Beaubourg

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1978
Near the end of the seventies Vangelis began experimenting with new directions and this album was the result. A lot of people think different about this album. It's all synth swooshes of sound criss crossing a direction he would try again with Invisible limits but this is far better. Not unlike Conrad Schnitzler's Contrasts or Klaus Schulze's Dune. But Vangelis's music always has so much emotive sound its hard to see this as a sci-fi epic. Really here he was trying to get away from his usual emotional stuff and go for cyborg sci-fi thing but his own style betrays him a bit. Part one is great part two drags in spots.

9,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Beaubourg (Remastered)

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1978 / 2013
Near the end of the seventies Vangelis began experimenting with new directions and this album was the result. A lot of people think different about this album. It's all synth swooshes of sound criss crossing a direction he would try again with Invisible limits but this is far better. Not unlike Conrad Schnitzler's Contrasts or Klaus Schulze's Dune. But Vangelis's music always has so much emotive sound its hard to see this as a sci-fi epic. Really here he was trying to get away from his usual emotional stuff and go for cyborg sci-fi thing but his own style betrays him a bit. Part one is great part two drags in spots.
This is the newly remastered version by Vangelis.

17,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Best in Space

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1994
This is a collection with his best tracks from the 70ies.

9,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Blade Runner (Soundtrack)

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1982 / 1994 / 2006
For a long period after the movie's original release in 1982, the music to "Blade Runner" remained one of the great unreleased soundtracks. Various theories have been offered over the years for why this should have been - the one that convinces me most is that Vangelis sided with director Ridley Scott in a dispute with Warner Bros over various artistic aspects of the movie, such as its ending and whether to use a voice-over or not. Vangelis has repeatedly stated that he abhors any interference into his own musical projects by "artistic nobodies" from the music-industry so he must have empathised with Scott and the fact that Scott finally got the version of the movie he approved of released in 1993 clearly prompted the soundtrack release the following year. This becomes even more clear from the personal note in the booklet from which it follows that it was Vangelis' very own decision to release the music at this point and not earlier, even adding some new pieces in the process of re-evaluating the movie plus music, a process which is itself very unusual as Vangelis hardly ever revisits past projects.
The movie is based (albeit very loosely) on a novel by cult SF writer Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) one of whose main literary concerns evolved around the tricky philosophical question "What is Human ?". This question and Dick's answer to it (i.e. "Human means Empathy") also form the basis of "Blade Runner" and manifest themselves at various points in it. So on one level there's the actual story with a few action-packed sequences but on a deeper, more relevant level there's the slowly evolving picture being painted of a future commercialised out-of-joint society where real people resort to transferring their hopes and ambitions to artificial animals cq. humans with a constantly blurred boundary between what's real and what's not.
All this must have appealed to both Scott and Vangelis whose contemplative music style appears tailor-made for the visually overwhelming and philosophically uneasy atmosphere of the movie. Examples of those atmosphere-enhancing pieces are both the Main and End Titles and the wonderfully loose 'Blade Runner Blues'. Others denote specific scenes, like the romantic 'Love Theme' which together with the 'End Titles' appeared earlier on the compilation album 'Themes' (incidentally: 'Memories Of Green', a Scott favourite, comes from the 1980 album 'See You Later'). The album fittingly ends with the emotional 'Tears in Rain' which accompanies the scene where the final runaway replicant Roy extends his empathy to pursuer Deckard just before termination.
Some vocals are provided by Mary Hopkin, Demis Roussos and Don Percival and a few key dialogue-samples from the movie are interwoven with the music here and there, but never in an obtrusive way.
As a conclusion: "Blade Runner" is possibly the best soundtrack album by Vangelis - the music, the movie and the ideas behind them certainly form another example of the many-levelness in which he revels.

 

12,50 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Blade Runner (Soundtrack)

Artist: Vangelis
P: 19
88
This is the orchestral version (released in 1982) of the soundtrack, music written by Vangelis, from the movie 'Blade Runner'. Although the Vangelis soundtrack (released in 1994) faithfully recreates the original mood as well as having additional songs and different arrangements...
...the arrangements from this orchestral adaption are just as good and in some cases even exceed the official Vangelis soundtrack!
Specifically, the vocal parts from "One More Kiss, Dear" and it's "AM distant quality radio effect" works very well. Another favorite is "End Title" which has a Tangerine Dream type of arpeggiator/sequencer effect and isn't included on the Vangelis soundtrack. Finally, Memories of Green is just a wonderful arrangement. Whether or not you like the movie, the music is something very special. Very Nice job to Vangelis and to the New American Orchestra! Both versions recommended.

9,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Blade Runner (Soundtrack) Vinyl

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1994
For a long period after the movie's original release in 1982, the music to "Blade Runner" remained one of the great unreleased soundtracks. Various theories have been offered over the years for why this should have been - the one that convinces me most is that Vangelis sided with director Ridley Scott in a dispute with Warner Bros over various artistic aspects of the movie, such as its ending and whether to use a voice-over or not. Vangelis has repeatedly stated that he abhors any interference into his own musical projects by "artistic nobodies" from the music-industry so he must have empathised with Scott and the fact that Scott finally got the version of the movie he approved of released in 1993 clearly prompted the soundtrack release the following year. This becomes even more clear from the personal note in the booklet from which it follows that it was Vangelis' very own decision to release the music at this point and not earlier, even adding some new pieces in the process of re-evaluating the movie plus music, a process which is itself very unusual as Vangelis hardly ever revisits past projects.
The movie is based (albeit very loosely) on a novel by cult SF writer Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) one of whose main literary concerns evolved around the tricky philosophical question "What is Human ?". This question and Dick's answer to it (i.e. "Human means Empathy") also form the basis of "Blade Runner" and manifest themselves at various points in it. So on one level there's the actual story with a few action-packed sequences but on a deeper, more relevant level there's the slowly evolving picture being painted of a future commercialised out-of-joint society where real people resort to transferring their hopes and ambitions to artificial animals cq. humans with a constantly blurred boundary between what's real and what's not.
All this must have appealed to both Scott and Vangelis whose contemplative music style appears tailor-made for the visually overwhelming and philosophically uneasy atmosphere of the movie. Examples of those atmosphere-enhancing pieces are both the Main and End Titles and the wonderfully loose 'Blade Runner Blues'. Others denote specific scenes, like the romantic 'Love Theme' which together with the 'End Titles' appeared earlier on the compilation album 'Themes' (incidentally: 'Memories Of Green', a Scott favourite, comes from the 1980 album 'See You Later'). The album fittingly ends with the emotional 'Tears in Rain' which accompanies the scene where the final runaway replicant Roy extends his empathy to pursuer Deckard just before termination.
Some vocals are provided by Mary Hopkin, Demis Roussos and Don Percival and a few key dialogue-samples from the movie are interwoven with the music here and there, but never in an obtrusive way.
As a conclusion: "Blade Runner" is possibly the best soundtrack album by Vangelis - the music, the movie and the ideas behind them certainly form another example of the many-levelness in which he revels.

 

23,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Blade Runner Trilogy (Soundtrack) (3 CD-Set)

Artist: Vangelis
P:
2007  
All music composed, arranged, produced and performed by Vangelis
Special three disc edition featuring unreleased & bonus material.
One of the best-loved soundtracks in the electronic music canon, the Blade Runner score is up there with the key works of John Carpenter in terms of its range of influence, and thanks to serial fiddler Ridley Scott and his incessant re-cutting tendencies, we now get to experience it all over again in an immense triple-disc edition released to coincide with the five-disc Blade Runner DVD odyssey that's currently doing the rounds.
The first disc features the score as was released on 1994's edition, while the second represents hitherto unreleased pieces and bonus material that appeared in the film but not on the original soundtrack release. The third disc is a special 25th anniversary revisitation of Vangelis' work on the film, comprised of new compositions based on the film. While the gratuitous sax scenes of the original soundtrack might have been a sign of the times, there's a certain garish quality to its usage on the new disc, but that said, it's still very much in-keeping with Vangelis' oeuvre, so no doubt fans will still lap it up, but it feels like an extra feature to the much-lauded material spread across those first two discs.
The foreword by the film's director, and knight of the realm, Sir Ridley Scott heaps praise on Vangelis' work, putting him right up there alongside contemporaries like Jerry Goldsmith and Hans Zimmer in the ranks of great modern film composers, but you'd also have to throw in some props for the amount of widespread public interest stirred up in electronic music in general, as a result of these compositions.

24,50 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Chariots of Fire (Original)

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1981
What can one say about this album which surely includes the best-known music by Vangelis? People who have just the one Vangelis album in their collection invariably bought either this one or the equally successful 'Themes'. Both the movie and this soundtrack won an Oscar of course and the first track 'Titles' has since then epitomized the Olympian ideal of excellence through sporting achievement. But the album also has a sort of spiritual feel to it, probably the reason why 'Jerusalem' by quintessential British religious composer Hubert Parry is included. This quality is evident in 'Five Circles', a rather stately piece having a Baroque touch, but even more so in the long closing piece. 'Chariots of Fire' could be described as a conventional piano-concerto - having a very contemplative atmosphere apart from a few lively outbursts. Vangelis (who is an absolute master of the inspired short form) clearly gave this a bit more thought than usual, showing that he can succeed in the long form as well, here aided by some excellent piano-playing. Most of its music wasn't used in the movie at all, in contrast to all the other pieces, which denote specific scenes.
A good soundtrack album and it makes one wish he'd released the similar sort of piano-concerto from material of the later movie 'The Bounty' as well.

12,50 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Chariots of Fire (Remastered)

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1981 / 2006
What can one say about this album which surely includes the best-known music by Vangelis? People who have just the one Vangelis album in their collection invariably bought either this one or the equally successful 'Themes'. Both the movie and this soundtrack won an Oscar of course and the first track 'Titles' has since then epitomized the Olympian ideal of excellence through sporting achievement. But the album also has a sort of spiritual feel to it, probably the reason why 'Jerusalem' by quintessential British religious composer Hubert Parry is included. This quality is evident in 'Five Circles', a rather stately piece having a Baroque touch, but even more so in the long closing piece. 'Chariots of Fire' could be described as a conventional piano-concerto - having a very contemplative atmosphere apart from a few lively outbursts. Vangelis (who is an absolute master of the inspired short form) clearly gave this a bit more thought than usual, showing that he can succeed in the long form as well, here aided by some excellent piano-playing. Most of its music wasn't used in the movie at all, in contrast to all the other pieces, which denote specific scenes.
A good soundtrack album and it makes one wish he'd released the similar sort of piano-concerto from material of the later movie 'The Bounty' as well.

11,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Chariots of Fire The Play

Artist: Vangelis
P:  2012
1924. The Paris Olympic Games.
A devout Scottish Christian runs for the glory of God. The son of an immigrant Lithuanian Jew runs to overcome prejudice. Two young track athletes who live for the beautiful purity of running and who prevail in the face of overwhelming odds.
Based on the extraordinary true story of Eric Liddell and Harold Abrahams, Chariots of Fire is an Olympic tale of hope, honour and belief.
Mike Bartlett is bringing one of the most thrilling Olympic stories to the stage for the first time in a dazzling new adaptation from Colin Welland’s original screenplay. His plays include Earthquakes in London for Headlong Theatre, 13 for the National, Love, Love, Love for Paines Plough, the Olivier Award Winning Cock, Contractions and My Child at the Royal Court and Artefacts at the Bush.
Directed by Hampstead Theatre’s Artistic Director Edward Hall, Chariots of Fire promises to be the theatrical event of our Olympic year.
The production will feature the music of the legendary Vangelis score, with additional new music written by Vangelis for the play.

18,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - China

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1979 / 1984
Even though quite short at some 40 minutes, Vangelis actually manages to capture all the diverse elements of Chinese culture, landscape etc. on this album, at least in the way it comes across to Westerners in the form of the archtypical century-old image: its tortured history (in 'Chung Kuo'), their whacky side (as in 'The Dragon' and 'Yin & Yang'), the delicacy of their art (as in 'The Little Fete'), the tranquillity of its country-side (as in 'The Tao Of Love'), its vastness (in 'Himalaya') and probably much more.
Adding to the atmosphere, the album-cover apparently shows Vangelis himself swimming in sort of jade/turquoise-coloured water.
The authentic "Chinese" sound was designed especially for this album only and manifests itself through the use of gongs, acoustic guitar-like sounds, various high ethereal sounds, all very pretty in a delicate way. However, some traditional western instruments are also used - on 'The Long March' Vangelis shows us how good a piano-player he can be and old friend Michel Ripoche has a nice violin-part in 'The Plum Blossom'.

12,50 EUR
 
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Vangelis - City

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1990
“The City” was the first album to make full use of Direct, the custom-built synthesiser hook-up device that essentially blurs the boundary between a studio- and concert-setup. It allows Vangelis to produce an album like this (seemingly played by multiple musicians) in a few studio-sessions on his own, to be immediately ready for release exactly as if it had been performed during a concert. Something like this did in fact happen because it took reportedly just one day in a Rome hotel-room to record all these pieces in a sort of private concert involving a few guests (like movie-director Roman Polanski) who also became part of the recordings.
The album’s concept (a day out in the city) is simple but works well here, providing Vangelis with ample opportunity to paint the various moods of the day in music.

Things start off serenely at ‘Dawn’, after the ‘Morning Papers’ some hectic activity occurs at the ‘Nerve Centre’, but escape from too much work is at hand through the ‘Side Streets’, to meet up with some friends (‘Good To See You’), perhaps for one of those long Italian lunches or else a late dinner at the ‘Twilight’ of day, after which it’s off to Trastevere to enjoy Rome’s night-time pleasures (‘Red Lights’) only to be interrupted by a ‘Procession’ of Vatican priests staging a protest against all the hedonism. Or something like that – anyway one gets the strong suspicion that the hero of this album’s tale might be a Greek foreigner staying at a rather too luxurious Rome hotel and generally enjoying life to the full.It’s a fair question whether the Direct device has really been all that helpful in Vangelis’ artistic output. One would think that, it being that much easier to do a concert or a new album, the volume of album releases and concerts would have gone up after its introduction, but somehow this hasn’t really proved itself to be true (because surely there should be at least one or two days per year like the one in Rome and although there was a public concert in Rome coinciding with “The City”, precious few have followed since then).
This might be accidental, to do with age perhaps, but it could also be true that previously, with much more effort having to be put into creating sufficient music to fill an album, not releasing it would be nonsensical and economically unfeasible. The situation could also be a bit stifling artistically because, if you can make an album in one day, who says you can’t make a better one tomorrow ?At least “The City” has worked out alright, the persistent use of a sort of mock Italian disco sound tends to make it a bit bland if also slightly reminiscent of parts of “Blade Runner”, but it does provide some musical gems like ‘Dawn’, ‘Nerve Centre’ and ‘Twilight’.

12,50 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Conquest of Paradise

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1992
4 Tracks from the soundtrack CD 1492. This is an excerpt from the 1492 soundtrack CD and also used as the introduction for the incoming of Henry Maske for his famous boxfight.
 

7,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Direct

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1988
The only Vangelis solo-album to be released on the Arista label, "Direct" is the favourite album of many of his fans, due to its variety in styles, clear-cut melodies and rhythms, and the obvious joy Vangelis had in using a new device built specially for him under the supervision of technician Bill Marshall, which also goes under the name Direct.Whereas on other projects some extra-musical concept provides the inspiration for the music (obvious candidates being the imagery associated with movies, or a person: El Greco comes to mind, or a culture: homeland Greece, also for example China) and the instruments used are only a means to achieve the goal of expressing that concept, this time the more mundane object of the instrument itself provides the inspiration to Vangelis.And an inspiration it must have been, because the Direct instrument (a sort of hook-up device for up to eight separate synthesisers) served to realise Vangelis' long-term goal, when playing a new piece, of achieving a particular sound-picture, being continually able to change the combination of instrumental voices and immediately recording the piece, all in one take, without any overdubbing afterwards or programming beforehand (although, to be sure, it can contain presets, but these are optional). Two examples of what it makes possible are:- Linking up a number of so-called arpeggiators (after the music-theoretical term "arpeggio"), which are sort of advanced sequencers that take their cue from what Vangelis plays on the keyboard they're connected to. A great example is the opening track 'Motion Of Stars' where a whole bunch of arpeggiators can be heard.- Real-time control of the precise dynamical shape, in terms of harmony, loudness and duration, of the echo-effect (listen to 'Oracle' of 'Apollo' for a good example). This to achieve multiple layers of sound, where a note or chord struck on for example the piano, is virtually simultaneously echoed in other layers, like bass and/or strings. There can be a danger of over-relying on this effect (even a composer like Beethoven displayed the somewhat annoying habit of very often having the flutes play the same melody as the violins) but usually Vangelis is acute enough to not overdo it.Vangelis seems to have used this first opportunity to use the device to fill an album with pieces in a whole range of styles. A piece like 'Elsewhere' is reminiscent of the album "Opera Sauvage", the up-tempo 'Dial Out' is a sort of rock-piece, there's a bit of opera ( 'Glorianna - Hymn a la Femme' ), which actually sounds more like a lament than a hymn), 'Message' is great symphonic piece, 'First Approach' is one of those typical tranquil pieces and the wacky final track 'Intergalactic Radio Station' shows Vangelis in "See You Later"-mode again (the text recited by technician Casey Young appears to be a parody in two ways: of the Blade Runner-monologue by the dying Roy Batty and of the sequence read by Keith Spencer-Allen and, much to his dismay, used on the "Albedo 0.39" title-track). So an appropriate sub-title to this album could be "Vangelis plays Vangelis" - in fact, he said something like this in a 1988 interview.There are always two directions from which to approach an artist like Vangelis (from popular or from classical music) and both are represented on this album. Although, in my opinion, the balance clearly swings towards pop (i.e. a collection of shortish mostly single-tempo "tunes you can whistle" with plenty of percussion and things like sampled electric guitars), on the other hand there are also plenty of mock-classical things in it like pan-pipes, harp, organ, harpsichord (at the end of 'Ave') and of course the un-credited soprano Markella Hatziano in the one genuinely classical piece 'Glorianna'.

13,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Direct (Remastered)

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1988 / 2013
The only Vangelis solo-album to be released on the Arista label, "Direct" is the favourite album of many of his fans, due to its variety in styles, clear-cut melodies and rhythms, and the obvious joy Vangelis had in using a new device built specially for him under the supervision of technician Bill Marshall, which also goes under the name Direct.Whereas on other projects some extra-musical concept provides the inspiration for the music (obvious candidates being the imagery associated with movies, or a person: El Greco comes to mind, or a culture: homeland Greece, also for example China) and the instruments used are only a means to achieve the goal of expressing that concept, this time the more mundane object of the instrument itself provides the inspiration to Vangelis.And an inspiration it must have been, because the Direct instrument (a sort of hook-up device for up to eight separate synthesisers) served to realise Vangelis' long-term goal, when playing a new piece, of achieving a particular sound-picture, being continually able to change the combination of instrumental voices and immediately recording the piece, all in one take, without any overdubbing afterwards or programming beforehand (although, to be sure, it can contain presets, but these are optional). Two examples of what it makes possible are:- Linking up a number of so-called arpeggiators (after the music-theoretical term "arpeggio"), which are sort of advanced sequencers that take their cue from what Vangelis plays on the keyboard they're connected to. A great example is the opening track 'Motion Of Stars' where a whole bunch of arpeggiators can be heard.- Real-time control of the precise dynamical shape, in terms of harmony, loudness and duration, of the echo-effect (listen to 'Oracle' of 'Apollo' for a good example). This to achieve multiple layers of sound, where a note or chord struck on for example the piano, is virtually simultaneously echoed in other layers, like bass and/or strings. There can be a danger of over-relying on this effect (even a composer like Beethoven displayed the somewhat annoying habit of very often having the flutes play the same melody as the violins) but usually Vangelis is acute enough to not overdo it.Vangelis seems to have used this first opportunity to use the device to fill an album with pieces in a whole range of styles. A piece like 'Elsewhere' is reminiscent of the album "Opera Sauvage", the up-tempo 'Dial Out' is a sort of rock-piece, there's a bit of opera ( 'Glorianna - Hymn a la Femme' ), which actually sounds more like a lament than a hymn), 'Message' is great symphonic piece, 'First Approach' is one of those typical tranquil pieces and the wacky final track 'Intergalactic Radio Station' shows Vangelis in "See You Later"-mode again (the text recited by technician Casey Young appears to be a parody in two ways: of the Blade Runner-monologue by the dying Roy Batty and of the sequence read by Keith Spencer-Allen and, much to his dismay, used on the "Albedo 0.39" title-track). So an appropriate sub-title to this album could be "Vangelis plays Vangelis" - in fact, he said something like this in a 1988 interview.There are always two directions from which to approach an artist like Vangelis (from popular or from classical music) and both are represented on this album. Although, in my opinion, the balance clearly swings towards pop (i.e. a collection of shortish mostly single-tempo "tunes you can whistle" with plenty of percussion and things like sampled electric guitars), on the other hand there are also plenty of mock-classical things in it like pan-pipes, harp, organ, harpsichord (at the end of 'Ave') and of course the un-credited soprano Markella Hatziano in the one genuinely classical piece 'Glorianna'.
Here the newly remastered version by Vangelis.

17,90 EUR
 
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Vangelis - Earth

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1973/ 2004
'Earth’ was the last album Vangelis made in Paris before setting up shop at Nemo studios in London. Released on CD at last in 1996 by Polygram Greece, it marks a transition between Vangelis the band member and the composer who would explode into the world with ‘Heaven and Hell’. The album is still song-oriented and made by what could loosely be described as a band: Robert Fitoussi (bass, vocals), Vangelis himself (keyboards, percussion), and fellow former Aphrodite’s Child band-member Argiris Koulouris (guitars).

Probably obliged by the record company to provide hit-material, both Koulouris and Vangelis wrote a simple but effective rock-song (‘He-O’ and ‘Come On’, respectively) but there the insult ends, because the rest of the album is vintage Vangelis. A lot of it has that elusive Mediterranean feel to it, sometimes revealing its darker side. ‘We Were All Uprooted’ must refer to the late-60’s exodus of Greek intellectuals escaping from the oppressive regime, as in fact Vangelis did (around this time, he was also to contribute to Melina Mercouri’s protest album ‘Si Melina m’Etait Contee’). But it all ends with music linked to nature in the form of the beautiful ‘A Song’, as if to say that worldly politics doesn’t matter and nature will survive all. What a romantic thought!

15,40 EUR
 
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Vangelis - El Greco

Artist: Vangelis
P: 1995 / 1998
This album expands the original 'Tribute To El Greco' (released semi-privately in Athens in 1995) to a full-length CD by adding three tracks (Movements III, V and VII) to the original ones, which have not been tampered with for this release - only reordered slightly.
The lavishly packaged 1995 release was limited to 3000 signed copies and officially obtainable only through the National Gallery museum in Athens which used the money thus generated to help acquire an El Greco painting (called 'Saint Peter') for its collection, although various copies have been bought by me and others through different channels. I've always found the reasoning behind this restricted release a bit suspect - if you really want to generate a sizeable sum of money then why not create a great album and make it an international (or certainly internationally obtainable) release, perhaps upping the price a bit to account for its charity purpose. Anyway, a great album it was so this rerelease has been much welcomed by fans unable to get hold of the original.
The project shows Vangelis at his most inspired by the almost exclusively religious paintings from Domenikos Theotokopoulos (to give El Greco his full name) and his general artistic outlook. This becomes apparent from a rare personal note by Vangelis in the booklet, which is basically the mystic statement that, in order to be a truly creative artist, one must be true to one's own nature and thus to Cosmic nature in general, as they are identical.
The music's flavour is very Byzantine, using Greek orthodox harmonies, church-bells, choir-sounds and more. It's got a faint religious touch and is both austere and rich at the same time - austere because of the generally sparse orchestration, rich because of its deeply felt emotions. One of Vangelis' main musical strengths, which is the use of rubato (the slight quickening up or slowing down of the tempo of the music to create those subtle effects), is very much in evidence throughout. Two singers from the classical world also make a contribution - a great aria by Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballe accompanied on piano and on another track tenor Konstantinos Paliatsaras.
The album's promotion (what little there has been) occurred mainly through classical channels and although it's hard to think of a classical composer creating music equivalent in nature to 'El Greco' still anyone who likes classical music (for instance Wagner - similar use of rubato, or perhaps Eastern European religious music) will in all probability like this music as well.

12,50 EUR
 
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