Syn

Syn this is the synthesist David T. Dewdney from Scotland / UK. In 2002, he had impressed with the publication of his first opus Soundwave Traveller, classified 5th best EM title of the year.
Syn
Syn - 61 Cygnus-Alpha

Artist: Syn
P: 2007
Some lovely deep analogue cosmic twitters reverberate and then echo into the distance as the fantastically spaced out 'Cygnus-Alpha' gets underway. Close your eyes and let your mind take you to the depths of uncharted space. There is a warmth to it all though, a sort of comforting environment enveloping and protecting us on our journey. From the eighth minute a lovely retro organ sound comes in giving things a rather 'Zeit' feel but this is more the backdrop than the main thrust, as a sort of slow moody guitar lead line takes the main focus. This is the only track on the album not to use sequences and the same laidback feel initially continues through 'Sea of Orion'. A suitably watery scene is set as waves break on the shore. Sonic shimmers add to the peaceful setting and seabirds fly overhead. Wonderful lush analogue drones rise through the mix. A slow relaxed rhythmic loop appears in the sixth minute driving things forward. A lovely ethereal melody dreamily plays over the top. It really come to life however when the sequence makes an entrance. An aggressive lead line completes a compelling oomph laden picture. 'Crystal Dreaming' has a very effective organ lead that is played in quite an aggressive percussive way, repeating a rather staccato melody. This forms the backbone for the entire track. A delicate ticking rhythm falls into formation accompanied by some excellent high register splashes then angelic mellotron choir. The wonderful mesmerizing brew seems to become more intense by the moment. Things get even more powerful and awe inspiring as yet another excellent sequence is launched into this fantastic bubbling cauldron of sound. A new lead line meanders over the top. What a superb track! The first three mammoth pieces on this album totalled over sixty seven minutes of music and many would have been happy to leave it there but not so on this CD as we have two extra shorter tracks as well. The first 'Silbury Hill' explodes into life on the back of a hundred mile an hour sequence, a lead line sort of skipping over the pulsations. A slow snare is added enhancing the depth of frequencies deployed. A burst of tron introduces 'Northwind' and a really nice sequence starts in its wake. A slow moody lead contrasts the energy oozing from the rest of the track. We finish as we started with a burst of mellotron. There is an honesty to this album. He does have a natural feel for 70s based sequencer music.

13,90 EUR
 
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Syn - Orange

Artist: Syn
P: 2004
We all love Berlin School music, classic EM, and all that, and none of us would ever want to do without it. Still, it’s a good idea to keep our mind open to al the other forms of EM that can bring some new colors into our musical life.
“Orange” is the color of this unexpected facet of Syn; this album is very different from his usual BS stuff, and it is extremely interesting precisely because of this. Syn calls this kind of music “minimalist techno” but it is “cybermusic”: you find that the chilling atmospheres generate cyberpunk film-like images in the listener’s mind, and we think that lovers of flicks such as Matrix or Ghost in the Shell will fall in love with it at once.
Nothing seems to happen in these tracks, but that is exactly what actually happens. If you think this is a difficult concept to understand, then just listen to it in a relaxed environment and in the darkness, if you can, and you will get what I mean. Tracks such as the beautiful “Connected” or the penetrating “Within my mind” will drag you through a virtual landscape made of data and impulses; if you have ever wondered what the inside of an android’s mind sounds like, listen to “Thought Patterns”.
You will also witness the encounter of classic EM and modern music in the surprising “Human Spirit”.
“Orange” will give you a new perspective on the talent of this artist from Scotland, who is not only capable of delivering some of the best classic EM around, but some of the best new EM as well.

13,90 EUR
 
incl. 19% tax excl. Shipping costs
Syn - Skyline

Artist: Syn
P: 2005
The first track on Skyline is called “Mellotropica,” but really that could be a fitting title for the whole album, as much a tribute to the Mellotron as Edgar Froese’s classic Epsilon in Malaysian Pale. Like Epsilon, Skyline uses the Mellotron as the main form of expression, keeping things very low-key and leisurely. No big sequencers, no crescendos that end in a big splash of synth leads and heavy rhythms, none of that. Well, okay, there is a slow marching tempo to “Skyline (Part-1)” that moves it forward, along with a cool squelchy vintage synth sound. But the Mellotron comes right back on “Distant Visions,” full of those tasty string sounds that are not quite like any other. Again, there is a pulse in the background to carry it along, but it is secondary. Tron flutes alternate with the strings, again showcasing this classic instrument as it was always intended. Of course, we can’t forget those choir sounds, and “Psytopia” adds those in abundance. At times, the similarity to Edgar is eerie, in this case “Psytopia” sounding a lot like Macula Transfer. This piece is more active than the others. “Skyline (Part-2)” goes back to Mellotron strings, again with a nice retro synth lead. Skyline’s 76 minutes will transport you back to 1976.

13,90 EUR
 
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Syn - Sonus

Artist: Syn
P: 2004
Sonus starts soft and slow with the piano and gentle synths of “Sonus (Part 1).” It plays like a prelude, the real start coming when “Part 2” picks up the energy with classic synths and sequencing, part Jean-Michel Jarre and part Tangerine Dream from the late 70s or early 80s. The next three parts make up the bulk of the disc, totaling over an hour between them. “Part 3” starts with a good moderate tempo and an enjoyable vintage synth lead line. Mellotron strings add a nice touch. As it builds some percussion is folded in. The main theme progresses for the first 10 minutes, then it settles back into a mellower section as bright synths flow in a circular pattern, breathing in and out. Eventually the main theme returns, as does the retro lead synth, before floating into a dreamy passage for the last 5 minutes, with a classic organ sound like parts of TD’s Phaedra or Stratosfear. “Part 3” is an impressive addition to Syn’s résumé. Just as good is the percolating sequence that starts “Part 4” off and running. Again the flavor is very much vintage Tangerine Dream, or Edgar Froese solo work from the same time period – but not simply a copy or cheap imitation. “Part 5” has more twitters and sweeps and deep space sounds, quite reminiscent of Klaus Schulze’s Timewind. But it too finds a catchy sequence and builds around that, even as the shrill twitters continue to rise and fall throughout. This is all excellent stuff, and reminds me why I loved Syn’s debut Soundwave Traveller. “Part 6” is clearly done with a wry smile on Mr. Dewdney’s face, as it is actually his version of “Oxygene Part 6” from Jean-Michel Jarre’s classic debut from 29 years ago. Great ending to a great CD that I highly recommend.

13,90 EUR
 
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Syn - Soundwave Traveller

Artist: Syn
P: 2002
Over 70 minutes of Berlin School heaven split over three tracks. Think of AirSculpture, RMI, Jiannis and even some of Edgar Froese's solo albums. This CD is pure sequencer / Mellotron indulgence. There are many layers to the shifting analogue (that word can't be stressed enough on this album) sounds. The constants tend to be the sequences which get a grip then just keep chugging along. Subtlety isn't the order of the day here, they are rather relentless. Restrained electronic percussion is added from time to time providing extra interest just when it is needed. Enough of the generalities, on to the thirty minute (plus) opening title track. Lovely cosmic bleeps and whooshes give way to equally spacey drones. We then get some gorgeous 'Epsilon in Malaysian Pale' type mellotron sounds. A percussive lead line shimmers above the drones. In the tenth minute a lovely deep typical mid to late seventies sequence emerges. The tron sounds get better and better as the sequence continues to pulse away. It's now more like 'Macula Transfer'.
Little lead lines come and go. Some of them purposeful and some of them more meandering, similar to earlier AirSculpture. With four minutes to go the sequence departs and it now sounds like some of the more atmospheric moments from 'Stratosfear' then 'Encore'. 'Freefall' is straight into another sequence, this time faster than in the first track. More tron sounds back it up and a very decent melody comes and goes over the top. Another repeated melodic motif almost acts like a sequence in its own right. This number reminds me of a couple of tracks from 'Ages' melded together. With five minutes to go the sequence starts to subside and what sounds like spaceships hurtling by at warp speed take over. Things then take a much darker turn, thick eerie pads dominating. I get the feeling that this might originally have been a much longer piece, if so I would love to hear the rest of it sometime. Sequences and mellotron are again pressed into action from the very first moment of 'Sonus (Part 3)'. A lead line soars over the top as the tron swells and falls around wonderful pulsations. Gradually a rhythm is added. My attention is dragged towards the leads one moment, the sequence the next and then as it bursts forth the gorgeous Mellotron. At around ten minutes we get a bit of a breather for classic TD atmospherics. Things start to build up again a couple of minutes later but never rise above a slow comfortable plod.
With four minutes to go we start the wind down towards the end. Windy effects, the odd note played here or there keeping the interest until the final lovely melodic pads fade into oblivion. As is mentioned in the liner notes 'don't expect melodic music with little harmonies' but do expect relentless 'Berlin School' sequencer music.

Here the last copy!

28,00 EUR
 
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Syn - The Glass Bridge

Artist: Syn
P: 2000 / 2006
Syn this is the synthesist David T. Dewdney. In 2002, he had impressed me with the publication of his first opus Soundwave Traveller, classified 5th best EM title of the year. At the time of an interview, he mentioned to possess more than 70 hours of recordings. The Glass Bridge did therefore leaves this gigantic musical bank that rests in the intrants of his creativity.
After an intro very floating, where the synthetic strates multiply themselves in softnesson of frugal laments, The Glass Bridge Parts I-III animates itself towards the final minute with a curled sequencer that recalls strangely the analogous dialect of Jean-Michel Jarre on Equinoxe. Piercing the rhythm progresses on of beautiful ones put to bed syntheticmellotron's, atmospheric percussions and a synthé blowing silky synthetic agreementsand sharp, in the even grinds that Jean-Michel Jarre on Magnetic Fields did. Shadowfall is a long title floating and very atmospheric. A crossroads between Meddle of Pink Floyd and Music for Airports of Brian Eno. Long, floating and very very touchy. Heart of Orion is a long tiraillement between the dense atmospheres and musical brightnesses that arise here and there, without really to taking form.
Syn's Glass Bridge, well.. is a personal opus. The creation kind that some says long on the character of an artist… Syn did big things, notably all from the beginning. For a reason that I am unaware of, the personage became bigger than its fans, than the music itself. This is an opus to the unfinished atmospheres. A title that should have remained in the the bank of Mr Dewdney. This squarely the production kind that did the delights of the journalists, and columnists, that would want to fall to shortened arm on the MÉ to disparage that this is cultural masturbation. Abstracted art. I do not like negativism, but with The Glass Bridge, Syn uses the reheated that already outfitted, fully and with more of originality, of others tables.

14,90 EUR
 
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Syn - Thru the Syngate

Artist: Syn
P: 2000-2002 / 2003
This is the second CD by Syn and basically if you liked the first 'Soundwave Traveller' you should also like this. 'Transcendant' begins with the sound of a plane landing then we are straight into a lovely mid paced sequence accompanied by some great analogue sounds. Edgar Froese's solo works came to mind, particularly 'Macula Transfer' and 'Ages'. Then again there are some bits which wouldn't have been out of place on 'Stuntman'. The Froese comparisons are actually apt nearly all the way through the CD. It's a great opener which works on every level, the melody being just as strong as the sequence. 'Slipstream' gets straight into an excellent sequence / rhythm combination.
The sequence reminded me very much of one of the tracks off 'Kamikaze 1989'. There is also a really nice moody lead line over the top, and the Mellotron at the end is simply gorgeous. 'Valles Marineris (edit)' begins with a rhythm which would have fitted perfectly on a Steve Roach album but with a backing of much more typical retro pads and wonderful tron sounds. It works extremely well providing a mid paced rather relaxing number which I just sunk into like an old comfortable chair. There is an appropriately rather cosmic start to 'Heart of Orion (edit)'. Quite dark thick pads are used as a base for brighter note droplets which fade into the distance. Again the combination of sounds and effects is perfect showing that Syn is just as competent a master of atmospheric detail as he is at deploying the sequencer. Like the first track 'Viking Mission' is another long one, this time at over eighteen minutes. The pace is picked up immediately as a rapid sequence strikes forth. Its very much late seventies TD but the superb lead lines would have been just at home on one of Peter Baumann's first two albums but still with many an Edgar Froese touch here there and everywhere. Awesome stuff!
The sounds used throughout this CD will take you right back to the mid to late seventies Berlin School heyday. Now 'Sonus Part 6' is a very curious one. For a start it reminds me so much of a hybrid of a couple of tracks I have heard before but can't quite place. The first part consists of dark waves of sound coming in crashes then in complete contrast there is a jaunty rhythm, a bit like Peter Baumann's 'Biking up the Strand' but I think there is an even closer comparison if only I can put my finger on it - ahhh! Even though a very similar palette of sounds is used here as on the rest of the album there is a very different 'feel'. Still lovely though. The title track returns us to a more typical mellotron / sequencer Berlin School blast. The sequence bounces along wonderfully and the surrounding sonic textures are pure perfection. In some ways it wouldn't have been out of place on 'Macula Transfer' but there is a little more of a bite or kick here than would have been found on that album. Simply an essential purchase for fans of retro / sequencer driven music.

13,90 EUR
 
incl. 19% tax excl. Shipping costs
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